An Agency of the Regional Offices of Education for Will and Grundy - Kendall Counties
Phone: (815) 744-8334   Registration: (815) 744-8337   Fax: (815) 744-8396  
Friday, November 15, 2019

Online Monthly Educational Book Studies

November 2019 - Hillbilly Elegy

PD Hours: 11Jill Sorensen-Davis
$60

Subtitled “A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis,” Vance recounts the struggles of his Appalachian family, who moved from Kentucky coal country to Ohio steel country for jobs and a better life—but are now caught in the demise of the U.S. manufacturing economy and a legacy of poverty, abuse and addiction. Although he mostly hews to the travails of his own family—and those of his Scots-Irish “hillbilly” culture—he deftly weaves into his narrative broad trends and research to help paint a portrait of a white working class in distress. In clear but powerful and sometimes self-deprecating prose, Vance describes how the Kentucky transplants to Middletown, Ohio, and their offspring jumped from the frying pan (poverty and loss of coal-mining jobs in Appalachia) to the fire (the loss of steel industry jobs in the Rust Belt). Their fleeting advancement to the middle class stalled when the economy went south and the family wasn’t able to overcome the legacy of domestic abuse, alcoholism and lack of education. Length: 272 pages

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December 2019-Dare to Lead

PD Hours: 13Jill Sorensen-Davis
$60

NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY BLOOMBERG Leadership is not about titles, status, and wielding power. A leader is anyone who takes responsibility for recognizing the potential in people and ideas, and has the courage to develop that potential. When we dare to lead, we don’t pretend to have the right answers; we stay curious and ask the right questions. We don’t see power as finite and hoard it; we know that power becomes infinite when we share it with others. We don’t avoid difficult conversations and situations; we lean into vulnerability when it’s necessary to do good work. But daring leadership in a culture defined by scarcity, fear, and uncertainty requires skill-building around traits that are deeply and uniquely human. The irony is that we’re choosing not to invest in developing the hearts and minds of leaders at the exact same time as we’re scrambling to figure out what we have to offer that machines and AI can’t do better and faster. What can we do better? Empathy, connection, and courage, to start. Length: 320 pages

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